We Can’t Get Anything Right

That may not necessarily be true, but I never have been able to properly classify Irish Death. It’s true. We used to try. It never worked.

What is this?

A robust porter.

Um, no, too high of alcohol and no roasty dryness in the finish

You’re right.

 

What is this?

A sweet stout.

No it’s not, the alcohol is too high

You’re right.

 

What is this?

It is a scottish export.

Wrong, too high of alcohol and too roasty.

You’re right.

 

What is this?

Imperial sweet stout.

That’s not a style you weirdo.

You’re right.

 

What is this?

It’s a scottish style imperial porterish sweet stout.

You made that up too.

You’re right.

 

These are examples of interactions I’ve had with people over the years where I still bothered to try putting Irish Death into a beer style category. As you can see, it never succeeded and as far as I can tell so far it is due to the fact that Irish Death doesn’t fit into any style category. Another thing to know is that up until this Christmas break, I always held in the belief that it did actually fit into one sort of catch-all category, American Strong Ale. Alas, I am even less informed than I previously believed. While confessing this withholding to my brother-in-law I flippantly brought up the style guidelines for American Strong Ale to demonstrate to my brother-in-law how it was a category established for no other reason than to be an ‘other’ bin. Wrong. As I began to read through the guidelines I see this tidbit “Moderate to high hop flavor.” Good grief, that surely isn’t Irish Death. Despite vagueness in this category such as

  • The malt gives a medium to high sweet impression on the palate, although the finish may be slightly sweet to somewhat dry.
  • Alcohol presence may be noticeable,
  • Medium to full body.
  • A fairly broad style that can describe beers labeled in various ways,

Irish Death still doesn’t fit.

Well, screw it. dark, smooth ale it is.

4 comments on “We Can’t Get Anything RightAdd Your Comment

  1. Conrad on

    Restaurant servers always call it a porter or stout! I kinda think it is reminiscent of a dopplebock to be honest. But with a bit more hops. So dark strong ale it is; really unique and worthy flagship beer.

    Reply
  2. Robert Goulet on

    Tried the Irish Death during St. Pat’s Day dinner. Server called it a stout, but said it was lighter than Guinness. Figured I’d try it. Definitely not a stout. Soooo much better. Possibly one of the most refreshing beers I’ve tried in a long time. I was walking through Safeway the following day and there was an Irish Death display at the end of the aisle. Had to be a sign, had to be destiny, maybe it was the universe aligning briefly in these dark times – whatever it was, grabbed a 6 pack. Great beer, great form. Thanks.

    Reply
  3. Robert Goulet on

    Tried the Irish Death during St. Pat’s Day dinner. Server called it a stout, but said it was lighter than Guinness. Figured I’d try it. Definitely not a stout. Soooo much better. Possibly one of the most refreshing beers I’ve tried in a long time. I was walking through Safeway the following day and there was an Irish Death display at the end of the aisle. Had to be a sign, had to be destiny, maybe it was the universe aligning briefly in these dark times – whatever it was, grabbed a 6 pack. Great beer, great form. Thanks…

    Reply

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