It’s Glamping Season

Why Glamping Is Still Camping

The way people travel has changed so naturally the way people camp has changed too. In today’s world there is no one-size-fits-all definition of camping. Some people like the traditional night on the ground in a tent, and others throw a mattress in the bed of their truck and sleep under the stars. Then there’s a group that likes to have a little more of the comforts of home available while still experiencing a new place. Glampers.

Glamping is for people who love nature and adventure but hate discomfort. I have not personally ever gone glamping, however, I am not opposed to the idea of having a more comfortable sleep or a shower.

Some people will hate on glamping, saying it’s not really camping but I’m going to make the argument that glamping is still camping for these reasons:

  1. It’s getting you to step outside of the comfort of your own home.

    You can wake up in a yurt on a mountain, stay the night in a treehouse, or find a hobbit house* to hole up in. You’re still exploring a place that is different from your everyday life.
    Yes, it’s nicer than just a tent. But these days people are dragging air mattresses, foam pads and cots with them on camping trips so comfort is becoming a part of most camping experiences. And it makes it easier to keep doing it as you age. Because let’s be real – sleeping with sticks and rocks poking your back is only tolerable when you’re a kid. Time to step it up.

  2. Nature is still a big part of the experience.

    Maybe the person staying in the treehouse gets to wake up with the sound of birds fluttering just outside the window. The tent camper gets all that too. Unless you have a phobia of the outdoors if you are glamping you’ll probably still go outside like you do with camping.

  3. You can still eat smores.

    If you’re camping, you’re outside melting them over a fire, and if you’re glamping maybe you’re using a grill instead. Either way you’re going to shoot for that perfect combo of delicious gooey marshmallow chocolate and graham cracker. Pro tip: step up your smores and make them Irish Death flavored by altering this recipe from The Beeroness.

  4. It still requires some preparation.

    Most camping trips require some preparation unless you’re taking a detour on the highway, parking, and sleeping in the car. As with camping you’re going to have to figure out supplies, meals and of course what beer you’re bringing. Planning and preparation will make your experience infinitely better. My favorite beer to bring camping is High Five Hefe.

  5. You’re still going to Pack It In, Pack It Out. Enough said on that.

     

    If you are a traditional camper, that’s cool. Kudos to you for being willing to rough it without any comforts of home. If you think sleeping in a queen bed in a yurt sounds like it’s for you then don’t worry about what your friends will say. Send It.

*No, this isn’t an ad for Airbnb, but if they want to throw some travel credits my way for posting links I would not object. Email nicole@ironhorsebrewery.com with all the good stuff or let me know why you don’t agree that glamping is camping.

 

Bonus DIY Glamping tips from the internet because why not.

Make your campsite extra glamorous by bringing these things:

* Step up your lighting with battery or solar-powered fairy lights.

* Rugs. Bringing a rug will help transform your campsite into a magical outdoor haven.

* Pillows, throws and cushions. Strategically place them throughout your campsite. Comfort is key. Mattress toppers are the true icing on the cake.

* Furniture. Bring a butterfly chair or a small folding table and chair set so you don’t have to eat on the ground.

* Alcohol. Treat yourself to your favorite indie beer (obviously), but also create a signature cocktail for the weekend.

 

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